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Great Sandy Scars

60.00600.00

In a small corner of the vast Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia, large sand dunes—the only sand in this desert of scrub and rock—appear as lines stretching from left to right. The light-colored fan shapes are scars from wildfires.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.

Icy Vortex

60.00600.00

Appearing as if an artist had randomly spurted ink onto the canvas, this image shows swirling ice in the Foxe Basin of northern Canada. Even though the image is from late July, there was still ice floating in the water this far north.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.

Lena Delta

60.00600.00

The Lena River, some 4,500 km (2,800 miles) long, is one of the largest rivers in the world. The Lena Delta Reserve is the most extensive protected wilderness area in Russia. It is an important refuge and breeding grounds for many species of Siberian wildlife.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.

Lurking Madness

60.00600.00

This Landsat image looks like a bold watercolor. Yellow dances across the darkness with muted violet underneath. With a kind of science-fiction flair, this scene shows a portion of the Qattara Depression in Egypt.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.

No Mans Land

60.00600.00

A study in shades of blue and brown is actually one of the harshest landscapes on Earth. This glimpse of Africa’s Sahara Desert, located near where the borders of Mali, Niger, and Algeria converge, is truly a no man’s land, a world of sand and rock without roads or settlements. The horizontal lines across the top half of the image are intrusions of igneous rock, where magma poked up to the surface from deep underground.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.

Okavango Delta

60.00600.00

Like a watercolor in which a brushstroke of dark green has bled into a damp spot on the paper, southern Africa's Okavango River spreads across the pale, parched landscape of northern Botswana to become the lush Okavango Delta. The delta forms where the river empties into a basin in the Kalahari Desert, creating a maze of lagoons, channels, and islands where vegetation flourishes, even in the dry season, and wildlife abounds.

Source image produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. This image is part of USGS’s ‘Earth as Art’ collection.